The Great Brain Movie Rights

Hi – I said every once in a while I might add something.  Today I received a fun email I thought you might enjoy.

 

Hi Carrie,
I hope you can help us. We’re working with a producer who is interested in the film rights to the Great Brain series. They’re a very large producer but have had trouble tracking down who controls these rights or even who is a good contact person for the estate. Do you know if there is a literary agency or lawyer who represents the interests of the estate with regards to matters like this? I appreciate any help you can provide.

Thank you!

Best,

Jesse

JESSE SOLOMON | RightsGenie 
Not only did Jesse Solomon contact me, but so did his partner Josh Brody.  I sent them what I had for contacts.  I then asked if I could share it with you.  Jesse wrote back – here is his reply.
Thanks for that information Carrie – any leads are useful.
Josh told me he reached out to you as well.
Producers often search for the rights holders to many many books when they’re conceptualizing a project. The factors that then go into whether a producer actually goes ahead and licenses those rights are varied. Even then, sometimes the license deal becomes public knowledge and sometimes it doesn’t. We are not actually involved in this particular project in any other way than helping track down who controls or represents the rights today and passing that information along.
And we found you through googling for John Dennis Fitzgerald – you were one of the sites that came up!
Anyway for what it’s worth – Maybe someday there will be a full movie or series on The Great Brain.  If I find out I’ll pass it along.

5 Responses to “The Great Brain Movie Rights”

    • Carrie Thatcher

      Mark – Me, too. I apologize for not responding 3 years ago. How embarrassing. I was excited to see comments here. So I thought I would check in. I fantasize about who and how a movie could be made. It would be so fun to have someone do it and do a good job with it.

      Reply
  1. Carrie Thatcher

    Me, too. The one from years ago needs a huge injection of style. It wasn’t bad for a start but with all the movie making skills out now, these books could really sell on screen.

    Reply
  2. Christopher L.

    I agree. I have started re-reading these books with my nine year old son. I devoured them starting when I was seven and a half. Getting to read them again is like bringing back an old friend. I loved reading all kinds of things growing up, and the Great Brain Series of children’s books are a big part of why.

    In later years I read the Lord of the Rings, which was amazing, but got quite tedious towards the end. Today’s Harry Potter series is but a shadow of a pale attempt at a real children’s book series to me.

    I never felt The Great Brain stories were tedious. They dealt with real-life issues and important concepts that the fantasy books couldn’t touch. They were wholesome and straightforward dealing with subjects from how to play “Kick the can,” “One-o-Cat ball,” and “Jackass leapfrog,” (a bit harsh-sounding but nothing to trouble about.) They dealt with death and disease, sickness and triumph in ways that never talked down to the young reader like most children’s books do, without being gratuitously graphic or overtly pagan like many of the supernatural series try to be these days.

    Values, family and manners, working together and still having fun and getting into fixes and getting out.

    I find reading these books with my son opens up great conversation starters from how ice cream is made, how toilets work, horses and food, school, and much, much more. After reading some together and then talking about what we read, he is curious and asking questions that show real progress of thought and thoughtfulness.

    I especially appreciate that religion is important to the stories, but not the dominant or overly preachy kind of sappiness found in many religious series. Indeed, the main characters are in the minority of their religious faith in their hometown.

    Having seen the one Great Brain movie with Jimmy Osmond, well, in my opinion, it changed too much from the actual books, convoluted the stories, left important ones out (no water closet story? For shame! That sets the whole series up.) The acting was stilted and the story choppy. I certainly have always wished that some smart film producer would come along and do justice to these books and make movies out of all of them. With Hollywood’s dearth of original ideas, reliance on sequels and too much computer imaging, these actual stories about characters who care about and live with each other in community would be most welcome.

    The conservative movie-going audience has shown it gets behind and supports quality stories like the Great Brain series. Make the films and they will come!

    Reply
    • Carrie Thatcher

      Christopher – I am so embarrassed that I never responded to this wonderful comment you wrote. I couldn’t agree more with all of your comments. Every once in a while someone asks for movie rights for the books. I don’t have that permission, but I sure wish I did. I would grant them to someone. These would be a great series.

      I have a facebook group entitled “The Great Brain Series”. If you want to check in and follow me there I would love it.

      And if you have a picture of your son with the books I would love to see it. I am always excited when the next generation gets a hold of these books.

      Reply

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